Publicity and Privacy in Early Modern Europe: Reflections on Michael Mckeon’s The Secret History of Domesticity

Publicity and Privacy in Early Modern Europe: Reflections on Michael Mckeon’s The Secret History of Domesticity

[vc_single_image image= »410″ image_size= »medium » frame= »noframe » full_width= »no » lightbox= »yes » link_target= »_self » width= »1/3″ el_position= »first »] [vc_column_text pb_margin_bottom= »no » pb_border_bottom= »no » width= »2/3″ el_position= »last »]

Chercheur : Brian Cowan

History Compass, 10: 599–607

The eleven essays in this special collection on “Publicity and Privacy in Early Modern Europe” engage with the arguments of Michael McKeon’s The Secret History of Domesticity: Public, Private and the Division of Knowledge (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 2005) from the perspective of the making of early modern publics. The essays emerged out of the work of an interdisciplinary collaborative research project entitled ‘Making Publics: Media, Markets and Association in Early Modern Europe, 1500–1700’ (MaPs). They demonstrate that the history of publicity and the history of privacy must be considered together, and as part of the continuing relationship of lived experience and the imagination.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1478-0542.2012.00875.x/abstract

[/vc_column_text]

X