Fiona Ritchie

Fiona Ritchie studies the history of the British theatre in the eighteenth century with a particular focus on the role of women. She is interested in questions of sociability, the role of emotions in the theatre, and provincial versus metropolitan performance culture.

Ritchie is the author of Women and Shakespeare in the Eighteenth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2012), which explores the part played by women (actresses, critics, and audience members) in establishing Shakespeare’s reputation as the English national poet. This book was shortlisted for the Society for Theatre Research Book Prize and designated a Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2015. She is also the co-editor (with Peter Sabor) of Shakespeare and the Eighteenth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2012).

She is now at work on a SSHRC-funded research project which analyses women and theatre outside London in the long eighteenth-century. She is also writing a monograph on late-eighteenth-century actors Sarah Siddons and John Philip Kemble as Shakespeareans, as well as collaborating with colleagues in the UK and Australia on a study of Shakespeare and riot.

Women and Shakespeare in the Eighteenth Century. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014.

Shakespeare in the Eighteenth Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Co-edited with Peter Sabor.

“Shakespeare Criticism.” In The Encyclopedia of British Literature, 1660-1789. Gen. ed. Jack Lynch and Gary Day. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015. 1123-1131.

“Shakespeare and the Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Stage.” In The Edinburgh Companion to Shakespeare and the Arts. Ed. Mark Thornton Burnett, Adrian Streete, and Ramona Wray. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011. 274-91.

“The Artistic, Cultural, and Economic Power of the Actress in the Age of Garrick.” In Shakespeare in Stages: New Theatre Histories. Ed. Christine Dymkowski and Christie Carson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. 107-23.

“Elizabeth Montagu: ‘Shakespeare’s Poor Little Critic’?” Shakespeare Survey 58 (2005): 72-82.

Tous droits réservés - Université du Québec à Montréal - 2013